Submission Guidelines

We are accepting your best Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Drama, and Craft Essays. The theme for Issue #11 is “Joy,” and we are looking for unique and arresting takes on this topic. Our submissions period runs for three months: February 15 – May 15, 2015.

NEW THIS YEAR: In order to keep Mason’s Road going, we unfortunately need to institute a $5 reading fee for all entries. You may still submit a $10 fee to be considered for the literary prize. ALL entries are subject to the $5 minimum reading fee. Submissions without a payment record will not be considered for publication.

Mason’s Road requires a $5 reading fee to be considered for publication. If you wish to be considered for the $500 Mason’s Road Literary Prize, there is an additional $5 entry fee (for a total of $10). Be sure to use the same name for payment that you used to submit your work so we can match your payment to your submission.

Please use this link to submit your reading or contest fee.

In our just-published issue, we feature work by prize-winning authors, including Alan D. Harris and Shoshauna Shy. We also have interviews on craft with memoirist Dinty W. Moore, screenwriter Jennie Webb, and novelist Paula Cappa. We are proud of the excellent array of work we selected from over 700 submissions, including the essay, “Tailspin,” by Carolyn Pledge Amaral, winner of the Mason’s Road Literary Prize.

Sponsored by Fairfield University’s MFA in Creative Writing, Mason’s Road is an online literary journal with a focus on the lifetime learning of the writing craft. It is run by the program’s graduate students, and its goal is to be both educational and inspiring. Anyone in the literary community is welcome to submit, comment on the current selections, and engage in a dialogue about our craft. Thank you in advance for helping us spread the word among your creative writing students, faculty, and contacts!

-  The Mason’s Road Editorial Team


Guidelines

We have a blind submissions policy and accept work in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama (stage or screen), art, and craft essays from both emerging and established writers and artists. Some of our dos and don’ts:

  • We only take online submissions.
  • Do not include your name or any identifying information within the attachment. We do a blind selection process which means we consider all work without knowing who wrote it. Please do not insert a header or footer containing your name, and please do not include your name and contact information at the top of the document.
  • Please submit only one document in a genre for each issue, and limit prose and screenplay/drama to 5,000 words (double-spaced), poetry to 3 poems (up to 3 poems in a single document).
  • Please put your submission into *.doc or *.rtf format.
  • Mason’s Road does not accept previously published work.
  • Simultaneous submissions are accepted as long as they are indicated as such and we are notified immediately upon acceptance elsewhere.
  • All published work will be archived online, and after publication all rights revert back to the author/artist.
  • NEW THIS YEAR: In order to keep Mason’s Road going, we unfortunately need to institute a $5 reading fee for all entries. You may still submit a $10 fee to be considered for the literary prize. ALL entries are subject to the $5 minimum reading fee. Submissions without a payment record will not be considered for publication.

Click Here To Submit Your Work

Click Here To Submit Your Payment

 


JOY

“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.” – Dr. Seuss. Why is it that writers have a difficult journey describing what it means to feel pure, magnificent joy? In order for us to appreciate joy, we need to have experienced failure, loss, and sorrow but how often do we direct our attention to that element of our lives? Characters like Anna Karenina felt the warmth of joy beside her love interest Vronsky, but those characters need to struggle to get there, or find the joy on their way to destruction and heartbreak. Vladimir Nabokov said, “The writer’s job is to get the main character up a tree, and then once they are up there, throw rocks at them.” As writers, whether we are writing poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or drama, we make sure our characters are dragged through the mud because if they’re not, what’s at stake for them? Perhaps a narrator is incapable of feeling joy, and will introduce a particular take on what joy actually means to them. We sometimes hold on too tightly to the struggles we’ve faced, our regrets, our pain of loss and death, and we ignore the moments that have made us radiate with happiness. With this Issue, we hope to challenge writers to experiment with their take on joy, and to inspire readers and writers to practice with abstract nouns, and find a new light to their own writing. Mason’s Road is excited to read submissions that will bring us into the world of those who experience joy, and to discover how that narrator gets there.